The Inspiring Blogger Award.

 

The wonderful ladies at Hot Heels, Cool Kicks & a Scalpel honored me with the Inspiring Blogger Award.  Thank you!

When I started this blog, it was meant as a way to chronicle my journey from maternity leave back to the workforce, but somewhere along the way it evolved into a diary of being a mother to three wonderful children, a doctor to many, a wife to one and a runner.  It has been cathartic in many ways and to think that I am helping to inspire other young physician mothers is something I never expected.  So, I thank you.

Now, here are the rules:

  1. Thank and link to the amazing person(s) who nominated you.
  2. List the rules and display the award.
  3. Share seven facts about yourself.
  4. Nominate 15 other amazing blogs and comment on their posts to let them know they have been nominated.
  5. Proudly display the award logo on your blog and follow the blogger who nominated you.

Seven facts about Dr. Mom:

  • I have a tattoo; it’s a small green alien
  • My favorite television series of all-time is The X-Files
  • I’ve wanted to be a doctor since I was 13 years old
  • I have an old-lady hobby… I cross stitch.
  • I went to an all-girls high school, let’s just leave it at that.
  • I am not a girly girl at all; I’ll take wearing jeans and a t-shirt over heels and a skirt any day, much to the chagrin of my husband
  • I have a hard time saying “No” to people.

Now, I’m supposed to direct you to 15 other bloggers whom I enjoy reading and find their stories inspiring and thought-provoking,  though I can only come up with 13 (*ducking*).  I don’t know if they’ve been nominated (I’m too busy to find out), so here goes:

http://halftherun.blogspot.ca/

http://crankygiraffe.wordpress.com

Behind the White Coat

Runner Under Pressure

Surgery At Tiffany’s

A Game of Diapers

Anna in Med School

Violent Metaphors

Doctors’ Bag

At least we made it this far…

The Poxes Blog

The Blog Runner

Generally Medicine

The Medium Is the Message

Day 17 – January Daily Blog Posting Month

The irony is not lost on me.

I succumbed.

Image

I bought an e-reader today.

I wrote a while back that I have not been reading books of late and it was something that really bothered me.  My attention span seems non-existent these days and I blame the Internet.  Well, my smart phone, specifically.  So, the other day at our local wholesale store, I saw the Kobo and started thinking I might read more using a “device”, since I use my phone so much at nighttime anyway.

As an experiment, I downloaded the Kobo App to my phone and bought a cheap mystery novel.  Over the past two nights, I’ve read four chapters.  Perhaps this is the way to go for me?

I’ll keep you posted.

Now to go open it up and figure out how the thing works!

Light Reading.

One of the toughest things I find while being on maternity leave is finding the time to read my medical journals.  Oh sure, there’s plenty of time to write my blog, surf the net, check Twitter and FB, eat food and nurse the baby.  But sitting down for 10-15 minutes to read a journal?  Surely, you jest!

I subscribe to several medical journals – CMAJ, CFP and NEJM. For some reason, I have stopped getting paper copies of CFP, so it’s even more rare that I read it.  However, CMAJ and NEJM come regularly.  And they pile up on my desk.

I will usually skim through the CMAJ but the one I read a lot of is NEJM (though you wouldn’t know it to see the stack on my desk right now).  I really enjoy the Case Records of the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Images in Clinical Medicine. Only in a medical journal can you see some gross stuff (well, I’m sure you can find lots on the Internet, but that’s a different thing).  Both are great exercises in problem solving.  The Case Records goes through a patient case step by step, from initial admission to discharge/conclusion.  Most of the cases are pretty obscure but there are a few that I have figured out before the diagnosis is given.  Same is true for the images, though most of the time I have no idea what I’m looking at because the medical condition is so obscure.  Still, it’s fun.

The only problem now is that I just don’t have the attention span to read the journals.  I am so, so tired.  I feel like a broken record. I read a sentence and I have no idea what I just read.  It’s not even that my  mind is on other things – my mind is actually nowhere.  Zombie-land.  Clouds. Ether.  I have no idea where it goes.

I know it’ll get better. I have done this before.  I know what that feeling will be like to wake up in the morning and realize I’ve slept for 7 hours non-stop.  My first thought will be, “Oh my God, is the baby ok?”  And then when I realize he’s slept through the night I’ll be beyond happy. Ecstatic.

Until then, the journals will continue to accumulate and hopefully, slowly but surely, they will get read.

Putting the mobile device down …

I used to be an avid reader.  I say “used to”, because, frankly, I think its been over a year since I actually finished a book.

Growing up, there were quite possibly hundreds of books in my parent’s house.  Books were everywhere.  I was always encouraged to read from a very young age. My father learned English by reading Louis L’Amour novels with a dictionary.  I seem to recall learning to read with a light-operated pen, much like the modern-day LeapFrog reading systems.   In grade school, we had to keep track of all the books we read each school year.  I still have reading logs from those days showing that I would read up to 100+ books in a school-year.

One of my favorite series was The Girls of Canby Hall. I think at one point I had all of the books.  I loved reading about the girls who lived in a boarding school.  I would often imagine what it’d be like to go to boarding school.  Now that I think about it, my dreams of having a group of girlfriends originated from reading this series.

As a teenager, I started reading a lot of my father’s books.  At the tender age of 14, I was introduced to the world of Sidney   Sheldon.  To this day, “If Tomorrow Comes” remains on of my all-time favorite novels and made-for-TV movies.  The movie is incredibly cheesy but what a fun ride!  I remember Sheldon’s novels always had strong female characters which resonated with me from a very young age.

In my later teens I started reading Tom Clancy.  I remember being fascinated with the world of espionage and if I’m not mistaken, the first novel my father suggested I read was “The Hunt for Red October”.  I must have read it at least two or three times before I really understood the book.  Of course, once the movie came out, the book made complete sense!

The last meaningful book I read was W. Somerset Maugham’s “Of Human Bondage“. I think what drew me to the novel was that the main character attended medical school, but it is so much more than just a man becoming a doctor.  It was a fascinating read and while I rarely read the classics, it reminded me of just how incredible these works of literature really are.  A couple of friends of mine are involved in a book club that plans on reading 100 of the best classic novels over the next 9 years.  It is quite a feat!  I was invited to join but declined for now.  Maybe once I get back into the swing of reading regularly, I will reconsider joining.

One might ask why, if I was such an avid reader, I stopped reading.  The answer is simple. Damn iPhone.

Seriously.  Since I got the iPhone, my nighttime reading has declined dramatically.  Instead, my nightly routine is to:

  • 1) check email
  • 2) check Twitter
  • 3) review Facebook
  • 4) browse Pinterest
  • 5) play Sudoku
  • 6) turn off light and fall asleep

The other night, husband told me he put down his iPhone at bedtime and opened up a book. Within two pages of reading, he’d fallen asleep.  I think it’s time to put the mobile device away at bedtime and open up a book.  So, yesterday, husband and I took the baby to the local bookstore while the older two kids were at school.  I found two books – the first, a fun read, Michael Crichton’s posthumously published “Micro“, and the second, an intelligent read, “Far from the Tree“, by Andrew Solomon.

Now it’s time to put the computer away and open up a book.